Keystone works to revive and restore indigenous culture and knowledge and help communities bridge development gaps through active participation in the sharing of traditional knowledge, and by educating the younger gener­ation about the necessity of a lifestyle that aligns, instead of opposes, nature. Keystone uses approaches like the community newspaper, community radio, and documentation of language and traditions to make sure that the unique and valuable culture does not become lost to time.

The objective of Keystone’s cultural programme is to bring forward initiatives from indigenous perspectives to promote social cohesion,  and integrate social, cultural, and economic realities. As Keystone strives to promote these initiatives, the Foundation ultimately understands that lasting change must happen with the full support of local people, and making sure communities are vested with the power to create the change they want to see in the world is core to how Keystone tries to encourage the maintenance of indigenous culture.

Programme Components

CHALLENGES

Transition of the traditional knowledge - In some communities, there is erosion of traditional knowledge  • Urbanisation - young people move to cities and because of that it can be a challenge for the elders to share traditional knowledge.

INTERVENTIONS

Documentation about sacred groves, plants, songs, stories and food •Information through Radio Kotagiri, Community Newspaper – Nilgiri Seemai Sudhi, Indigenous Calendar and Cultural Education for children • Craft Development - Through training younger people in craft development, like Kota pottery and Kurumba painting • Knowledge to the Government - Festivals, documentation and bringing people together result in knowledge that helps the Government allocate funds and draw up plans for the indigenous communities in the Niligiris •  Celebration of indigenous heritage by larger community

IMPACTS

Restore indigenous culture, pride and knowledge  • Sharing of traditional knowledge and educating the younger generation  • Indigenous communities have greater confidence in dealing with the government and other agencies

 

 

 

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